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With near total decay of Kenya sport, hope is in new Minister Amina to take drastic action for a turnaround

RIGHT from the onset of independence, Kenya proved herself talent-laden in sport. Success at world hockey (once fourth best in the world), iconic track and field star performance of legends like Kipchoge Keino, Naftali Temu, Amos Biwott and Ben Jipcho and the organising of the world spectacle East African Safari Rally went hand in hand with Kenya’s renown in politics, agriculture (coffee and tea) and tourism.

Sport was always important in the country’s unity and social ‘psyche’. These days, as fortunes have changed, the status of the country’s sport is of widespread concern. Over the years, general direction of sport has been neglected so much that on the spotlight right now is outright embarrassment to the country.

Top: Kenya Cabinet Secretary for Sport and Heritage, Amina Mohammed in Nairobi recently talking to officials and athletes of Team Kenya before they left for the 12th African Games in Morocco. Above Cabinet Secretary Amina Mohammed (left) with renown Motor Rallying legend Michele Mouton of France in Nairobi. Mouton was an FIA (International Automobile Federation) safety delegate to the recent Safari Rally in Kenya which is angling itself to become a World Rally Championship (WRC) event

Top: Kenya Cabinet Secretary for Sport and Heritage, Amina Mohammed in Nairobi recently talking to officials and athletes of Team Kenya before they left for the 12th African Games in Morocco. Photo/MOHAMMED AMIN. Above Cabinet Secretary Amina Mohammed (left) with renown Motor Rallying legend Michele Mouton of France in Nairobi. Mouton was an FIA (International Automobile Federation) safety delegate to the recent Safari Rally in Kenya which is angling itself to become a World Rally Championship (WRC) event

From a great start at Independence, Kenya sport in most cases has taken a backward dive, remained stagnant and been blemished by scandal; for instance, of widespread use of banned drugs by athletes, chaotic leadership of national sports associations and misuse of money allocated by Kenya Government and county governments for sports infrastructure and development programmes.

At the just-concluded 12th African Games in Morocco, the overall best nation was Egypt who won among others, 102 Gold medals. They were followed by Nigeria (46 Gold), South Africa (36), Algeria (33), Morocco (31) and Tunisia (26). Kenya at No. 7 had a meagre (11 Gold medals). Those who termed this as a Kenyan (population approximately 50 million) success have a strange sense of measurement. In sports where Kenya had attained top continental and world class, standards have slipped down to unbelievable depths including; hockey, boxing, cricket, basketball, football and rally motorsport (Safari was, since 1972 to 2002, a World Rally Championship – WRC – status event).

Kenya Cabinet Secretary for Sport and Heritage, Amina Mohammed (left) with Principal Secretary Kirimi Kaberia try out terrace seats being installed at the Nyayo National Stadium earlier in the year. Below: With members of the Parliament Committee on Sport, Culture and Tourism, CS Amina on the stadium seats at Nyayo Stadium. Work then stalled, quality of the seats were questioned and in any case, the spectators have continued to sit on concrete terracing, see further below

Kenya Cabinet Secretary for Sport and Heritage, Amina Mohammed (left) with Principal Secretary Kirimi Kaberia try out terrace seats being installed at the Nyayo National Stadium earlier in the year. Below: With members of the Parliament Committee on Sport, Culture and Tourism, CS Amina on the stadium seats at Nyayo Stadium. Work then stalled, quality of the seats was questioned and in any case, the spectators have continued to sit on concrete terracing, see further below

Other African nations have diversified they participation in sports. In sharp contrast, Kenya’s top class excellence has narrowed. In 2016 the Olympic Games movement had had 28 sports, five additional disciplines are due to be added to the 2020 Summer Olympics program. The just-concluded African Games in Morocco hosted 26 disciplines. Kenya entered 22 of them but were only victorious in Athletics (track and field) and volleyball. The only other medals picked up outside this were in Boxing, Cycling, Tae-kwon-do and Swimming.

No one could have noticed this under-performance more than the country’s President Uhuru Kenyatta, a man conversant and indeed endeared to sport. On the sidelines of the Games in Morocco, the President was urging young sportsmen to aim for world class excellence in the sport and that the nation would support them because it was good for general development of the country.

He told a bunch of young motocross riders headed to an international competition: “It is our (as Kenyans) duty to nurture, to grow and develop (sports) talent [so that] young men and women have the opportunity to fly our flag high. We should not just look at how we compete (among ourselves) in Kenya. Our target is how shall we compete internationally? How shall we help these young men and women compete internationally?

“I want to give the assurance that we shall support (sport). And we want to encourage our young people to expose that talent that they have — whatever it maybe be. I want to assure you that my Government will support ALL SPORTS because we know we have talent in every single sport we take part in.”

The little progress made in the stalled project of Karat Stadium, in President Uhuru Kenyatta’s Gatundu South backyard, Kiambu County

The little progress made in the stalled project of Karatu Stadium, in President Uhuru Kenyatta’s Gatundu South backyard, Kiambu County

The President pre-empted the topic that the entire nation is engaged in; the dire absence of sports stadiums because national and county governments, nationwide, have been unable to complete proposed projects.

Preside Uhuru was saying: “We are developing [MISC] Kasarani to be the home of all our [sports] associations. As Government we want to create facilities that nurture the talent we have in all the different fields. [At Kasarani] we are going to construct a closed stage for the [motorsport] Safari Rally, re-develop the football stadium, the athletics stadium, basketball, a circuit for motocross … all sports areas.  Ours is to get the best out of what our children can be. To encourage them.”

President Uhuru Kenyatta (right) has said he wants world class standards of managing Kenyan sport in all spheres. His administration was on the right footing when spearheading the hosting of the U18 IAAF Championships at Kasarani in 2017. Re-vamping sport may require the gusto of his revered Interior Minister Fred Matiang’i was in charge briefly for the last stages of the athletics event also attended by IAAF President Seb Coe (middle). Photo/MOHAMMED AMIN

President Uhuru Kenyatta (right) has said he wants world class standards of managing Kenyan sport in all spheres. His administration was on the right footing when spearheading the hosting of the U18 IAAF Championships at Kasarani in 2017. Re-vamping sport may require the gusto of his revered Interior Minister Fred Matiang’i (left) who was in charge briefly for the last stages of the athletics event also attended by IAAF President Seb Coe (middle). Photo/MOHAMMED AMIN

What is undisputed is that there exists a widespread sense of deep disappointment. And that sport is clearly also felt as a yardstick to measure somewhat the country’s serious low morale and poor all-round performance in other walks of life.

The country has been left so much behind that many times it has lived under the danger of inability to host international football home fixtures. At the moment, a Kenya national football team or top soccer club can only stage a FIFA (Federation of International Football Associations), or CAF (African Football Confederation) match at Moi International Sports Centre (MISC), Kasarani, in Nairobi’s northern suburbs. Over 50 years after Independence this shame is unfathomable; in an era where even in small nations of Africa such as Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Rwanda, Senegal etc., football and indoor basketball infrastructure is of stellar standards.

The level of retrogression is deep-rooted; a malaise that the current Government administration — of President Uhuru Kenyatta and Deputy President William Ruto — even before they took over in 2013, said they would address; by taking a serious approach to sport, structuring it for world class development and mass involvement as well us building the required infrastructure, e.g. stadiums, and putting out an outlay of technical expertise throughout the country to boost mass participation in sport, raise it to professional standards and create employment for youth and economic benefits to all associated with the sports industry.

World class organisation … a commentator works at a packed Moi International Sports Centre, Kasarani during the U18 IAAF Championships in 2017. Kenya hosts the U20 IAAF Championships (July 7-12, 2020, and have just under 10 months to replicate their good show two years ago. Photo/MOHAMMED AMIN

World class ganisation … a commentator works at a packed Moi International Sports Centre, Kasarani during the U18 IAAF Championships in 2017. Kenya hosts the U20 IAAF Championships (July 7-12, 2020), and have just under 10 months to replicate their good show two years ago. Photo/MOHAMMED AMIN

Wananchi (citizenry) hold the scorecard of the current Government’s follow-up to their sports development promise. It is replete with very poor grades, indeed. The scandal about none of 10 stadiums, marked for upgrade and building since 2013, not having taken place is just a tip of the iceberg about Kenya sport gone into decay.

The mainstream media has of late reacted to a widespread demand by Wananchi, to expose the rot that has gone on in sport in a long recent while. The coverage has exposed that the Ministry of Sports and Heritage; its development agency Sports Kenya; their projects’ consultants and the Ministry of Infrastructure and Public Works, owe a lot of explanation to the country — why they have literally caused Kenya sport to ground to a halt after the promised stadiums round the country remain a ‘myth’, ‘phantom’ (non-existent, mere empty promises).

Not so rosy ... the stalled construction on Kamariny Stadium in the athletics talent-rich Elgeyo Marakwet County. This situation is replete nationwide and Kenya at the moment has, for instance, only one stadium that stage international fixtures sanctioned by FIFA (Federation of International Football Associations] or CAF (African Football Confederation)Not so rosy ... the stalled construction on Kamariny Stadium in the athletics talent-rich Elgeyo Marakwet County. This situation is replete nationwide and Kenya at the moment has, for instance, only one stadium that stage international fixtures sanctioned by FIFA (Federation of International Football Associations] or CAF (African Football Confederation)

Not so rosy … the stalled construction on Kamariny Stadium in the athletics talent-rich Elgeyo Marakwet County. This situation is replete nationwide and Kenya at the moment has, for instance, only one stadium that can stage international fixtures sanctioned by FIFA (Federation of International Football Associations] or CAF (African Football Confederation)

This week, President Uhuru Kenyatta has working engagements in Nyeri County. Customarily, development — and in particular physical — is usually part of the President’s agenda on domestic tours. He is unlikely to escape the disappointed eye fixed on him by the people of that region; why sport is neglected, why the promised upgrade of at least Ruring’u Stadium — from a once bubbling centre of nurturing talent, including Olympic Games aspirants — has not been done.

A building expert will tell you that Ruring’u Stadium has a reasonably well constructed wall around it. Funded by the Nyeri County Government and for only Sh 2 million, it is the only evidence of diligent work done there. The County Government was doing that in appreciation that the National Government’s Sports Ministry, its agents Sports Kenya and the Ministry of Infrastructure and Public Works, had promised that the stadium, worth Sh288.045 million would be built. But nothing of the sort has been done by the contractor allocated the job — M/s Funan Construction Company. Sources told ‘voiceofsports’ that far much more money — than the county’s Sh2 m on the wall — had been spent on the contractor for the rest of the stadium but there was little to show for it.

What answers will President Uhuru have for the people of Nyeri; and the country in general; because an international standard approved Nyeri venue means benefit to all Kenyans?

The ‘Stadia Scandal’ is just one of the ills of Kenya Sport that President Uhuru and his Deputy William Ruto were expected to deal with since coming to power in 2013. The situation may have pre-dated the arrival of the duo but many expected decisive action by people appointed to run sports by the administration with the efficiency and single-minded focus that has been witnessed in other spheres; such as inn Education [Universities, high schools and Kenya National Examination Council reforms  by Messrs Fred Matiang’i and George Magoha], Security affairs by Ministry of Interior [Messrs Joseph Nkaisery, Fred Matiang’i] and Kenya Defence Forces, Ministry of Health with admirable devolution of services to the counties and quest for universal health care  and the Ministry of ICT for massive digitization of national management systems.

Sports Cabinet Secretary Amina Mohammed (right) watches action at the National Police Service annual athletics championships at Moi International Sports Centre, Kasarani with Ministry of Interior CS Fred Matiang’i (on her right)

Sports Cabinet Secretary Amina Mohammed (right) watches action at the National Police Service annual athletics championships at Moi International Sports Centre, Kasarani with Ministry of Interior CS Fred Matiang’i (on her right)

World sport runs by one of the most sophisticated styles of modern life. To remain moribund, without vision and innovation, Kenya looks at being left behind in sports development by irrecoverable distance. It needs a “saviour” of the mold of Nkaiserys, Matiang’is and Magohas of the of world President Uhuru’s Jubilee administration or the remarkable [John] Michukis of the previous President Mwai Kibaki’s.

Bad things in Kenya sport came calling, long ago. And now enter new [Minister] Cabinet Secretary Amina Mohammed a lawyer and career diplomat from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs via [briefly] the Education docket. Her previous taste of how sports people can do things badly was when, as Foreign Minister, she had to make a hasty weekend trip to Canada leading a delegation to save Kenya from being expelled from the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

She faced and negotiated with WADA (World Anti-Doping Agency) so that Kenya could be allowed more time to put measures in place to deal with blown out use of “drugs” [performance enhancing substances] that had put the country on the same step with Russia whose proved Government-initiated doping programmes caused their expulsion for the Rio Olympics.

Ambassador Mohammed has her work cut out to deal with an absurd situation in Kenya sport. It does not get any easier given the history of elements of rogue leadership in many sports associations.

Poor caliber stadium in Embu County. Sport is a devolved function and there ought to be a sposts Ministry in each of Kenya’s 47 counties developing sustainable programmes, building infrastructure, providing facilities including equipment

Poor caliber stadium in Embu County. Sport is a devolved function and there ought to be a sposts Ministry in each of Kenya’s 47 counties developing sustainable programmes, building infrastructure, providing facilities including equipment

It is an established fact that majority of sports federations’ leaders in the country have styles that will never take sports — a devolved activity in the modern administration of the country – anywhere. The federations’ leadership are almost entirely all based in Nairobi. Contact with satellite activity outside Nairobi reaches only about 10 or so other counties. Sports structures and activities are virtually non-existent in say counties such as; Mandera, Wajir, Marsabit, Isiolo, Turkana, Pokot, Garisa, Tana River, Lamu and Kwale.

Then there is the lackluster performance by staff of her Ministry of Sports and Heritage that Amb Amina joined in March 2019.

Whether he likes it or not, President Uhuru’s legacy at the end (20220 of 10 years’ administration will have a mark down on what it did for sport. He has and will continue to be confronted with the ‘stadiums debacle’ until he leaves office. His Deputy, William Ruto, if — and he has shown he does — harbours the ambition of succeeding his boss in 2022, carries the issue of sport round his neck and he may have to deal with it while it is not too late; before his appointment with the voter in 2022.

Meanwhile, the poor state sport in the country isn’t just about the unbuilt stadiums. It is the failure to drive sport as an important cog in Kenya’s socio-economic development.

Through Parliament the country formulated a forward-looking Sports Act 2013. It formed the Ministry of Sports, Culture and the Arts (MOSCA’s) agencies for modern development. Key among them was Sports Kenya. This was the agency that was mandated, to on behalf of the MOSCA, manage sports policy, infrastructure and general development programmes.

But the Ministry’s lack of adherence to Parliament-made laws was made evident with reluctance to enable Sports Kenya operate in relative independence. Sports Kenya, never mind the individual competency of those heading its Board, remains a mere an extension of Civil Service bureaucracy; in a sports world where decisions and action are timed ‘by the second’.

The Sports Act was diligently pursued by former Sports Minister Paul Otuoma and Permanent Secretary James Waweru was promulgated in the Jubilee Government era, the pioneer Cabinet Secretary being Hassan Wario and the implementing ministry’s (MOSCA) chief executive officer being Principal Secretary Richard Ekai. Even though generating of dynamic ideas for modern sport are expected of Sports Kenya, there appeared furious intent not to relief them off the shackles of ‘civil service bureaucracy’ of MOSCA.

When the country puts up a successful international event, everyone is happy and national morale upbeat … Deputy President William Ruto (nearest to camera in cap) in an excited moment watching the national soccer team, Harambee Stars, on the way to the 2018 Cecafa Challenge Cup at Kenyatta Stadium, Machakos. Below, DP Ruto with Kenya’s 800m world record holder David Rudisha. Photos/MOHAMMED AMIN

When the country puts up a successful international event, everyone is happy and national morale upbeat … Deputy President William Ruto (nearest to camera in cap) in an excited moment watching the national soccer team, Harambee Stars, on the way to the 2018 Cecafa Challenge Cup at Kenyatta Stadium, Machakos. Below, DP Ruto (right) with Kenya’s 800m world record holder David Rudisha. Photos/MOHAMMED AMIN

The ineffectiveness of Sports Kenya since thepromulgation of the Sports Act is shown by, for example, the lack of open head-hunting for a progressive Sports Kenya CEO (chief executive) since inauguration. Previously known as Sports Stadiums Management Board (SSMB), Sports Kenya has been headed, since 2013 in ‘acting’ capacity by civil service’s Gabriel Komora, Gordon Oluoch and Ms Saumu Ondimu. General sports fraternity viewed them as unlikely to press for radical progressive ideas as possibility of ‘confirmation or not’ to the post was a carrot dangled at them so they did not ‘rock the boat’.

The recently recruited Sports Kenya CEO is Pius Metto, formerly a National Hospital Insurance Fund manager. He arrived smack on a period that Sports Kenya and MOSCA in general was embroiled in ineffectiveness caused by long stretch of indifferent management.

The Sports Act, by the formation of Sports Kenya, Registrar of Sports, Sports Tribunal and Sports Fund, designed a new era for Kenya sport. But the Ministry of Sport since the Wario/Ekai, Wario/Kirimi Kaberia, Rashid Echesa/Kaberia era has shown little determination to let these Ministry agencies operate to their best and optimum abilities.

The disappointment among the sports fraternity is the dreaded possibility that — during the era of new Cabinet Secretary, Amina Mohammed/Kaberia — the Ministry will continue causing it agencies to operate as mere extensions of the tired ‘civil service’.

Driving a new age sports policy and structural revolution for sport in Kenya was what was envisaged by the Sports Act and the formation of Sports Kenya, Sports Registrar and Sports Fund in particular. And instead of bogging himself/herself with mundane micro managing of sports federations’ and individual issues, the Cabinet Secretary of Sports should work at the broad subject of revolutionising management of sport in the country — a broad style of problem solving as witnessed in some already mentioned ministry’s where remarkable CSs brought up ideas completely from ‘outside the box’.

The Sports CS must ensure the national sport is fully guided by the Sports Act. That is the law; and, after all that is what the country’s lawmakers saw fit.

In the Sports Act, below is just part of crucial role Sports Kenya is charged with:

  • Ensuring that Kenyan sport and recreation is supported by adequate and well maintained facilities
  • Constructing, providing shared utility for equitable access and maintenance of sport and recreation facilities to support transformation and development of the sports and recreation sector
  • Providing equipment as well as basic services for public facilities to be fully functional

This is so that this can contribute to:

  • youth talent development
  • optimal use of facilities
  • integrated national sport and recreation programmes and activities
  • diversification in sport and recreation
  • preventive and fitness health via especially programme of mass sports. This has a direct link towards preventive health and wellness hence the [President Uhuru’s Legacy ‘Big 4 Agenda] on universal health
  • manufacturing of sports goods and services; another part of the ‘Big 4 Agenda’

Meanwhile she must take head-on the issue the role her ministry, Sports Kenya and other interested parties at the arrival of the state Kenya sport is in. Then she must take measures of redress.

The latest revelations, puts the management of Sports Kenya on the spot over imprudent administration of public funds leading in-completion contracted work at stadia round the country.

Incomplete, unusable Kipchoge Keino Stadium in Eldoret

Incomplete, unusable Kipchoge Keino Stadium in Eldoret

However, the Ethics and Anti- Corruption Commission (EACC) which is investigating the management of Sports Kenya over irregular award of tenders has already proved itself up to task and surely a clear picture will come out. Action, possibly including severely punitive may be forthcoming as has been witnessed elsewhere.

Initial proposed budgets in the records of the Auditor General differ with those of Sports Kenya for the projects at Moi International Sports Centre (MISC) and Nyayo National Stadium in Nairobi, the Kipchoge Keino Stadium in Eldoret and Kinoru Stadium (Meru) all which were earmarked to host the aborted 2018 CHAN (African Nations Championship).

Amid the national outcry over the current state of ongoing stadia infrastructure projects by the national and county governments, Sports Kenya and the (National Assembly) Parliament Committee for Sport Culture and Tourism have made visits round the country and their reports should for basis for action; and obviously eyes will be fixed on CS Mohammed’s action.

This will reveal names of contractors charged with the works; the scope of works as defined in the contracts; what actual work was done based on correct measurements; how many certificates of completion were issued and description of work for each issued; who was responsible for generating the verification and are there any discrepancies; how much was paid and should there have been discrepancies, if excess paid would undertake what work.

Some of the biggest question marks are over the ‘Stadia Saga’ or on proposed work on relatively larger facilities that were earmarked for Kenya hosting the 2018 CHAN football tournament in which the national Football Kenya Federation (FKF) was a chore part of the Local Organising Committee (LOC). They collaborated with Sports Kenya and MOSCA.

Work included preparing pitches, and stadium infrastructure at MISC Kasarani, Nyayo National Stadium, Kinoru Stadium (Meru), Kipchoge Keino Stadium (Uasin Gishu), and Kenyatta Stadium in Machakos.

The audit shows that Sh1.609 billion tender was awarded to M/s Auditel Kenya limited, a subsidiary of Auditel Indenieria Services from Spain for remodeling the five premium pitches.

The South African company was required to undertake design, mobilisation, grass removal, irrigation, levelling, soil preparation and fertilization and installation of specialized grass- Bermuda/ paspalum.

An audit inspection carried out in Meru and Eldoret in March this year revealed that Gregori International carried minimal works at Kinoru and never did any works at Kip Keino or any other training grounds in the two town despite being paid.

It was also required to install sporting equipment in the five main pitches and 10 training grounds for CHAN 2018. This included designing, supplying, testing, commissioning and supervision of security, access control, communications, audio-visual and pitch lighting systems in the stadiums.

However, as at April 12, 2019, it was revealed by the auditors that the contractor had only presented the designs for the contracted works to Sports Kenya.

Also a recent evaluation visits say all those pitches are now unsatisfactory and flooding occurs at MISC, Nyayo.

Sh971,457,265 was awarded to M/s Gregori International SA for renovation of the five pitches and Sports Kenya was to supervise and certify the work done. The report further notes that no activities related to the contract had begun on the ground on both the premium pitches and the training grounds.

The security guarantees for the project had also expired on February 28, 2018 and no evidence was presented to the auditors for re-validation at the time of the audit.

“In view of the foregoing, value for money has not been obtained and the delays to project completion may lead to unacceptable projects cost,” the report says.

Contracts were awarded and some money paid out to six contractors in 2017 for the construction of eight county stadiums that remain incomplete with a majority being abandoned.

Notes on contractors, budgets, consultants and status reveal the picture below of the eight county stadia round the country:

1 Ruring’u Stadium (Nyeri County): Budget – Sh320 million – M/s Funan Construction Company; amount paid –Sh64m; certified pending bills – Sh42m. Still requires Sh255m to complete

2 Kamariny Stadium (Elgeyo Marakwet): Sh287.84 m – M/s Funan Construction Company. Amount paid – Sh58m; pending bills – Sh22m. Still requires Sh228m to complete. The construction works, which entailed construction of Kerio Valley View Point, VIP pavilion, changing rooms, reference rooms, medical rooms, anti-doing room, office for stadium management pitch works and track lanes, started in January 2017 with completion due in May 2018. However, the report reveals that at the time of the audit inspection in March this year, there was no noticeable pitch and track works and that the site had been abandoned.

3 Kipchoge Keino Stadium (Uasin Gishu): Initial cost of project Sh757m; amount paid – Sh288m; pending bills – Sh85 m. Still requires Sh 555m to completion

4 Karatu Stadium, Gatundu South (Kiambu): Sh259.604 m – M/s Smith and Gold Productions limited; amount paid – Sh 39m; pending certified bills – Sh39m; Still requires Sh220m to complete. Due for completion in May 2018 after the commencement of works in February 2017. But the contractor abandoned the site due to failure by Sports Kenya to pay for certificates, Sh 39m.

5 Wote Stadium (Makueni): Sh299.309 million – M/s Taphes and Nitram Enterprises limited. Amount paid – Sh 49m; pending bills – Sh5 m. Still requires Sh 222 to complete. Works commenced in January 2017 and were expected to have been completed by May 2018. But as of May 2019 no noticeable pitch and track works, underground excavation, perimeter wall and that the site had been abandoned despite the monies being paid. The contract had also expired and had not been renewed or extended.

6 Kirubia Stadium, Chuka (Tharaka-Nithi): Sh274.208 – M/s Toddy construction. Amount paid – Sh 119m; pending bills – Sh41m. Still requires Sh155m to complete. Commenced in January 2017, was expected to be completed after nine months. But a majority of the works – pitch works, a six lane track, VIP pavilion, water system and ablution blocks had not been completed as at March this year.

7 Marsabit Stadium (Marsabit): Sh295.263 m; amount paid – Sh 88m; pending bills – Sh36m. Still requires Sh235m to complete

8 Kinoru Stadium (Meru): Initial cost of project – Sh869m. Contract Sh442.137 m – M/s Toddy Construction Company limited. Amount paid – Sh309 m; pending bills – Sh387m; Still requires Sh 559m to complete. Works started in January 2017 and was expected to be completed in August the same year. An audit inspection in March this year showed that the contractor was yet to be paid Sh244.842 million and had threatened to stop due the payment delays

The larger-budget facilities (several sources of funding):

1 Moi International Sports Centre, Kasarani: Awarded to M/s Nitram and Taphes Enterprises Limited; for construction of an indoor sports facility.  Still requires Sh612m to complete

2 Nyayo National Stadium (Nairobi): Initial cost of project – Sh 1.156 billion. Cumulative amount paid – Sh525m. Pending bills – Sh227m –  M/s Lexis International. Two projects awarded in August 2017 for completion in 14 weeks. Project consultants – Ministry of Infrastructure and Public Works. Total still required for completion – Sh612m

In Parliament, affairs including the current state of national sport and the ‘Stadia Saga’ are overseen by:

Parliament Committee on Sport, Culture and Tourism:

Chairperson:

Hon. Munyaka, Victor Kioko

Vice Chairperson:

Hon. Ole Lemein, Korei

Committee Members:

Hon. Chebaibai, Jane Jepkorir Kiptoo

Hon. Iringo, Cyprian Kubai

Hon. Sitati, Daniel Wanyama

Hon. Kamuren, Charles

Hon. Mizighi, Lydia Haika Mnene

Hon. Tum, Tecla Chebet

Hon. Mlolwa, Jones Mwagogo

Hon. Sunkuyia, George Risa

Hon. Shinali, Benard Masaka

Hon. Kibeh, Annie Wanjiku

Hon. Maritim, Sylvanus

Hon. Omulele, Christopher

Hon. Lomorukai, Jeremiah Ekamais

Hon. Oduol, Prof. Jacquiline Adhiambo

Hon. Oduor, Christine Ombaka

Hon. Nguna, Charles Ngusya

Hon. Mukhwana, Titus Khamala

-Additional reporting from ‘Daily Nation’ extracts

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